Driftwood Tides- On Sale Now

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Review from Jesus Freaks Hideout: 

“As always, Gina Holmes paints vivid characters who are fraught with frailties, yet bear the hope of being something more. They are real, deeply felt, and unmistakably unique. In this novel, there is a confused bride-to-be, an insecure groom, a haughty socialite, a drunken driftwood artist and an intensely loyal bathing-suit-top-wearing artist’s assistant. They are authentic, lovable and even aggravating at times–just like family. And yet they have the capability, with the help of a loving Father-God, to become more than the sum of their parts. They can be what God created them to be.

I love the metaphor of the driftwood artist. It is what God is to us. He can take old scraps of wood, beaten and worn, and turn them into something useful and beautiful. This story is about imperfection and brokenness, and how even the ugliest of elements can be repurposed for His Glory.”

– Review date: 8/8/14, written by Connie Almony of Jesusfreakhideout.com







He made himself an island until something unexpected washed ashore.


When Holton lost his wife, Adele, in a freak accident, he shut himself off from the world, living a life of seclusion, making drifwood sculptures and drowning his pain in gin. Until twenty-three-year-old Libby knocks on his door, asking for a job and claiming to be a friend of his late wife. When he discovers Libby is actually his late wife’s illegitimate daughter, given up for adoption without his knowledge, his life is turned upside down as he struggles to accept that the wife he’d given saint status to was not the woman he thought he knew.

Together Holton and Libby form an unlikely bond as the two struggle to learn the identity of Libby’s father and the truth about Adele, themselves, and each other.

Want to Win This Amazing Table?

To help promote my latest novel, DRIFTWOOD TIDES, I’m giving away this completely amazing book table.

Book Table

Here’s how to enter:

During the month of September, 2014

1. if you buy a new copy of Driftwood Tides, latest novel by Gina Holmes Ebook or paperback), simply friend her on facebook athttps://www.facebook.com/gina.waters.372 and message or comment that you purchased it. (Receipt with date will be required if you win and the date must be by Sept. 29th, 2014.

The winner will be randomly drawn on Sept 30th, 2014, and announced on my facebook personal and author page. You will also be notified via fb message if possible. 

Winner will have 7 days to claim their prize, provide a valid shipping address (continental US only) and phone # for shipping purposes and receipt of purchase during the month of August or September, 2014.

2. No purchase neccesary: You will also be entered if you post a review on any of the major book buying sites before Sept. 29th, 2014 You will still need to friend Gina at above fb address and comment with a link to your review. If you win you may be asked to prove you are the author of the review. 

Prize may be substitued for prize of equal value. (unlikely)

*You may enter more than once 1 entry for review (regardless of how many sites you post review) , 1 entry per new book purchased (kindle or paperback, receipt required dated prior to Sept. 29th). *If you do not wish to purchase a book but want to enter via review, you may borrow it from local library, bookswap or friend.



Driftwood Tides



“Holmes weaves a superb story of discovering how to forgive.”  Romantic Times





Jesus Freak Hideout Reviews Wings of Glass

Author Gina Holmes does a masterful job pulling the reader into this character’s life without overloading the reader in a world which can be disconcerting to many. Rather than begin the story in a tedious development of abuse, or saturate us in the violence of the present, she starts us at a point where Trent is injured, leaving Penny to fend for their family, offering her both challenges and opportunities. As Penny writes to her young son, Manny, “I hate to wish bad things on you, son, but I hope you get the privilege someday of having no one to lean on but God. It changes a person. It sure changed me.” Penny is forced to connect with others, and as God often does, He provides someone who can see through the lies Penny uses to “protect” her husband, and can guide her in ways to protect herself.” Jesusfreakhideout.com Read the rest HERE.

Join me, Karen White, Diane Chamberlain and others February 9th…

Book Club Movable Feast


Bookmarks invites you to join us for a Book Club Movable Feast 
Sunday, February 9
3:00 – 5:00 PM 
Milton Rhodes Center for the Arts, Winston-Salem, NC

Back by popular demand, Bookmarks will present our 2nd Annual Book Club Movable Feast. It will be held at The Milton Rhodes Center for the Arts, in Winston-Salem, NC. 

The program will begin at 3:00 PM sharp. Attendees will be seated at tables where they will be joined by an author. Over the course of the Movable Feast, 25 published authors from all over the country will sit with attendees to talk with them about his or her recently published book. This year, each table will be visited by 8 authors for 10 minutes each. Opportunity for further discussion will proceed and follow the Movable Feast.

Doors open and book sales begin at 2:15 PM. Booksignings will follow the program.

Tickets include light refreshments which will be served throughout. 

Wings of Glass–Chapter One

Prologue:

He always said if I left he would kill me, but there are far worse fates than death. Guess I hadn’t really known that until I met and married Trent Taylor. I didn’t mind the cuts and bruises half as much as the insults and accusations. Whoever said, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me” has never been on the other end of a tongue that really knows how to cut.

I hope you never know that kind of pain, Son. More than that, I hope you never cause it. How could you? You have such a soft heart. My sweet Emmanuel.
Surely by now I’ve told you your name means “God with us.” Because he was, Manny. He is. Even if you haven’t realized it yet, you’re lucky to have such a wonderful name. I used to hate mine—Penny—because that’s exactly how much I felt I was worth for most of my life. But God used you to change all that.

It’s important to tell you before I begin this story that it’s not my intention to make you hate your father. He’s a man—fallen, like the rest of us. But I know you’ll ask about him, and I decided when you were old enough, I would share with you all I know. That day hasn’t come yet—you’re just beginning to talk!—but I’d best write it down while it’s fresh in my mind. Although some of it, I know, will never fade.

Reading this won’t be easy, and please don’t feel you have to if it’s too much. I’m not one to believe all truths need to be spoken, but just in case you want to know, need to know, I’d rather you hear it from me as a whole story than get bits and pieces of the puzzle from others and not be able to make them fit together quite right.
Besides, your grandmother told me long ago the best way not to repeat history is to know it. I think that’s probably right.

Chapter One

Trent Taylor sauntered into my life wearing faded blue jeans, dusty work boots, and an attitude I couldn’t take my eyes off.

We had a bumper crop that summer of ’99, so Daddy was able to hire a farmhand to help for a change. We were all so happy to have a little money in our pockets and another set of harvesting hands, we didn’t look a gift horse in his mouth. It was just like that story from the Trojan War. We all let him right in without looking first to see what was inside him.

It’s surreal to think that if the rains hadn’t fallen just right and the price of tobacco hadn’t been up due to a blight that seemed to be hitting every farm but ours, we wouldn’t have been able to afford to hire Trent. How much pain I could have been spared . . . but then I wouldn’t have you, Manny. I’d go through it all a million times just to have you.

Being late August, the air outside was steam and the smell of the roast Daddy insisted Mama cook every Thursday carried past me on what little breeze there was. As usual, our cat, Seymour, kept busy chasing the chickens around the yard. He loved to terrorize those poor birds. I yelled at him like I always did, but he never paid me—or anyone besides Daddy—any mind.

Until that afternoon, I’d never seen those chickens do anything but run from mean old Seymour, but that day the smallest one turned around and pecked him right between the eyes. I still laugh when I think of that cat howling in surprise and jumping back ten feet in the air, tail first, as if God himself had snatched him, only to drop him.

After Seymour tore off and the chickens returned to scratching dirt, I bent over my laundry basket and got back to work, humming something or other through the splintered clothespins tucked between my lips.

Even though we owned a dryer, your grandpappy hardly ever let Mama or me use it. He couldn’t see the sense in wasting money on electricity when the sun and wind would do the job for free. I would have offered to pay the measly expense myself, but in my father’s household, women were meant to be seen working, not heard complaining.

I bent down to pin up my daddy’s undershorts, doing my best not to touch anything but the outermost corner of the waistband, when I felt hot breath on the back of my ear and a rough hand cover my own. Paralyzed, I just stood there staring straight ahead at the dirt road leading from our driveway. I could feel my pulse pounding my temples as I held my breath.

Trent must have taken my lack of protest as encouragement because his other hand wrapped tight around my waist and he yanked me back against him. He whispered in my ear with a voice somehow both rough as sandpaper and smooth as whipped cream, “This better be the last time I ever see my woman touching another man’s underwear.”

I could barely breathe. At seventeen, I’d never been touched by a man except to have my tail whipped for disobeying. I’d never even held a boy’s hand, and here was a man, a grown man, staking claim to me. Just then, the screen door squealed open and your grandpappy’s heavy footsteps pounded across the porch.

When Trent stepped back, I finally got the courage to turn around and look him in the eye. He’d been around for a couple of weeks by then and I’d seen him dozens of times, but until that moment, I hadn’t noticed the crinkles around his eyes that made him look like he was always squinting against the sun, or the small scar cutting into the fullness of his bottom lip. His longish hair was a shade darker than my dirty blonde, and there was something about the way his nose flared just so that brought to mind a fighter plane. People might have said a lot of things about your father back then, but no one could suggest he wasn’t beautiful.

“What are you doing over there?” My father stood on the porch, leaning his hip against the column and holding a glass of water that was sweating as much as he was.

I yanked up my laundry basket, still half full, intending to bound inside, but didn’t make it a step before I felt that rough hand of Trent’s wrap tight around my wrist again.
“Just taking a break,” he said to my father, though he never took his eyes off me. He stared right through me, wearing a smirk. I would get to know that Cheshire grin real well in the years that followed. It was the look he wore when he knew he had won, or was about to. I wonder just what it was he had seen that gave me away.

“You best get on back to work.” Daddy’s voice was loud as thunder, and it shook me.

Trent’s grin only widened. “Now, don’t be that way to your future son-in-law.” His eyes wandered over the front of me like he was eyeing a ham steak he was getting ready to cut into.

Those roving eyes of his sent unfamiliar jolts through me.

Daddy slammed down his glass on the porch ledge. “Are you listening, boy? I ain’t going to tell you again.”

Trent put his hands up like he was under arrest. “Take it easy, man. I’m just talking to her.”

My heart felt like a butterfly caught in a mason jar. No one spoke to my father that way.

What an idiot I was to think Trent’s bravado was because he was so taken with me. In my mind I was the princess, Daddy was the dragon, and Trent, of course, was the knight who’d come to rescue me from the tower.
With my father’s eyes on us, Trent whispered I was the prettiest thing he ever laid eyes on. I twisted my mouth like he was crazy, but inside, I was done for. I’d never had a man tell me I was pretty.
I took the bait. With one pathetic cast of his line, I was snagged, swallowing his words happily as that hook dug deep into my flesh.

When Daddy’s face took on a shade of sunburn and he started down the stairs, Trent pretended to tip the hat he wasn’t wearing and leaned over to whisper that he would be waiting for

me at the well at midnight and his woman had best be there. Woman, I repeated in my mind, liking the sound of it. He reeled me in that night, and before week’s end I’d agreed to elope.

At Trent’s direction, I left a note for my parents telling them they shouldn’t come looking for me.

Despite my fears, though—and eventually, my hopes—my parents never did come knocking to reclaim me. No one did.

 

 

 

 

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